Category Archives: Irish Green Party in Government 2007 to 2011

The Irish Green Party entered Government in coalition with Fianna Fáil in June 2007, and exited in February 2011 just prior to the General Election campaign. The party suffered severe losses in both that General Election and the previous local and European Elections. It now faces the task of rebuilding both the organisation and public confidence in the party. This series of blogs covers some of the more momentous moments of the party’s time in office.

Irish Green Party in Government 2007 to 2011

The Irish Green Party entered Government in coalition with Fianna Fáil in June 2007, and exited in February 2011 just prior to the General Election campaign. The party suffered severe losses in both that General Election and the previous local and European Elections. It now faces the task of rebuilding both the organisation and public confidence in the party. This series of blogs covers some of the more momentous moments of the party’s time in office.

‘Case history’ on how not to do coalition government.

Apparently the Irish people cannot have a general election any time soon according to the latest communication from the Green Party’s Dan Boyle. Why so?  Well to summarise – the Irish voters would put the Labour Party and Fine Gael into Government – two political parties the Greens’ deem unsuitable. Under any other guise this statement could be labelled totalitarianism! Continue reading

Review of Fianna Fáil/Green coalition government

Red Pepper, a UK left wing magazine, asked me to write an opinion piece on the Irish Green Party in Government.   The article was written late December in time for Red Pepper’s current edition.

Government eats up the Greens

“Last October, Irish Green Party members reaffirmed their commitment to staying in power with the centre right Fianna Fáil party, by voting to support a mid-term renegotiated Programme for Government (PfG). 

More significantly the party also voted to support the coalition government’s favoured initiative to rescue Irish financial institutions, the National Assets Management Agency (NAMA). 

In the weeks leading up to the vote, Green Party Leader, John Gormley announced that the new PfG would be transformational – a statement which succeeded in focusing media attention on the new agreement negotiations and away from the controversial NAMA. Continue reading

Clinging on to power

What ever way you look at it, these last few days have seen the Green Party reach a new low, and I’m not only talking about the opinion polls.  This sorry state of affairs has been brought about by the Green’s insistence to clinging on to power, at all costs. 

As we all know the latest drama concerning the Green Party is former Senator Deirdre de Burca’s dramatic exit.  I’m not going to comment on Deirdre’s departure, nor will I trust any of the subsequent statements coming from the party’s politburo.  When Chris O’Leary, Patricia McKenna and myself left last year, nasty spin was the party’s default defence mechanism.  Continue reading

“Should I Stay or Should I go?”

 Dáil Chamber
Tomorrow the Green Party will ask themselves the big question Should I Stay or Should I Go?” when they decide if they should support the new Programme for Government and  NAMA .

Or pull out of Goverment and probably cause a General Election.

Much media time and interest is being spent on the newly negotiated Programme for Government however I believe the burning question, and real issue on the table tomorrow is NAMA. Continue reading

Greens in Coalition – The Irish Experience

Bronwen with Joseph Healy and Cllr. Romayne Phoenix

Bronwen Maher is a guest speaker at a meeting being held the Green Party of England & Wales annual conference in Brighton this weekend.  The meeting is being organised by Green Left. Her speech titled ‘Greens in Coalition – the Irish Experience’ tracks the experience of the Green Party in government and its impact on voters, the membership and the party’s future.

Maher claims that  “The Irish Green Party party has lost touch with people’s everyday lives .  The Local and European elections in June also showed that the crisis facing the Irish Green Party is that traditional Green voters will support a viable and credible alternative to the official Green Party candidate”.